CBeebies Waybuloo Christian Response

I am thoroughly enjoying having my two grandchildren (2yrs & 8 Months) to stay and am inevitably watching far too much TV, especially CBeebies!

I was intrigued with a new program called Waybuloo, which showed children engaging in Yoga to achieve a state of happiness. Here is a few descriptions of the program for you to get the flavour:-

Parents will be invited to do yoga with their toddlers and hug them in a new BBC children’s TV show.

Mothers and fathers may be forgiven for thinking they have travelled back to the late 1960s when they sit down with their children to watch Waybuloo.

The series, which it is hoped will be as big a hit as the Teletubbies, is said to be imbued with a ‘hippy’ philosophy.

Viewers will be encouraged to hug each other to achieve happiness and the show’s characters float when they achieve the zen-like condition of ‘Buloo’.

The four ‘Piplings’ – Lau Lau, De Li, Nok Tok and Yo Jojo – teach youngsters how to deal with their emotions as they travel through the countryside of Nara.

BBC publicity for the show claims: ‘Waybuloo is not just a series, it’s a philosophy for a happy life.’ It claims that the Piplings embody a range of emotions including love, wisdom, happiness and harmony and ‘personify positive emotion’ by floating.

Waybuloo Cbeebies

Waybuloo Cbeebies

Zen-like: The four Piplings, who float when they are happy, encourage children to try yoga in new BBC show Waybuloo

Nok Tok is bear-like and represents wisdom. He solves problems and comes up with creative, inventive solutions for fixing and mending things. He has a very colourful toolbox and a special Anything Machine which can solve a multitude of problems.

In each episode, six children visit Nara to play with the Piplings and explore their land, as real life interacts with the animated world, showing that every child can visit Nara and find their own Waybuloo. Children will be able to play with the Piplings, learn yogo with their parents and experience Waybuloo moments for themselves through the magical world of Nara on the CBeebies website.

Gosh they get to them early now don’t they. I wish that the BBC would be so keen to promote wholesome Christian values to our young ones. The only true joy that can be achieved in this life, is in the Lord Jesus Christ. Happiness is a superficial, fleeting emotion, only Christ can give an everlasting true Joy.

There is certainly nothing wrong with hugging and physical expressions of our love to our children, but do we really need an eastern philosophy to teach us to do this? If we do, then it is a sad day indeed!

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58 Responses to “CBeebies Waybuloo Christian Response”

  1. Christian Mum Says:

    Congratulations for being the only Christian to blog about this. (Wow that’s sad.)

    Saw the pilot(?) episode last week, was pretty shocked to see children at home being encouraged to participate in what is essentially a form of Hindu worship (like to see the BBC encourage children to participate in Christian worship, yeah like that’s ever going to happen). Husband and I quickly decided we’re not allowing our children to watch it, 3 yo daughter has very quickly decided that tinypop is OK (dare I say better…) and doesn’t even seem to miss CBeebies at all.

    I’m not particularly surprised that the secular BBC has no problem teaching yoga to pre-schoolers, what I am surprised about is the total lack of interest being shown in this by the ‘Christian’ community. So well done you for highlighting it!

  2. Emma Says:

    Yes, I thoroughly agree. When the series started a few weeks ago, alarm bells rang for me. I felt it was too Buddhist/Yogic and wondered what on earth the BBC were doing producing such a programme with such heavy influences. They’ve commissioned 50 programmes and I read somewhere have commissioned a further 50. We are to be inundated it seems.

    However, I turn over when it comes on and shall continue to do so. Yes, it looks pretty, but that’s about all it’s got going for it. Levitating animals, yoga positions and philosophy, and the wind chimes/crystals resonating harmonically; don’t the BBC realise how anti Christ this programme is or perhaps they don’t care and are embracing eastern mysticism. And yes, it’s hard to imagine them producing a similar programme that encourages participation in the Christian faith.

    More comments please from the Christian community.

  3. Andy Says:

    My wife and I watched Waybuloo for the first time this evening and were shocked to see the clear references to idol worship and meditation as part of this supposedly well-meaning children’s programme. We agree with the comments above and strongly recommend you voice your concerns directly to the BBC. If they do not receive complaints then they will go ahead and commission the next 50 programmes – this is the way it works. Just visit bbc.co.uk and click on complaints at the bottom of the page and you can send it by email.

  4. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    I’m so glad I’m not the only one with concerns about this programme and found this blog.

    I have two boys aged 7 and 3 and have generally had no concerns about CBeebies stuff. They were giving away free DVD samples of Waybuloo’s material in my youngest’s nursery – so I picked one up and later watched it with my 3 year old. This was the first I had seen/heard of this programme.

    I guess the ‘crystal machine’ at the start is a clue – and even the name – WAYbuloo’s. Let’s remeber that christianity started off being called ‘The Way’ and christians were called followers of ‘the Way’. It appears on second thought that this programme is promoting itself as ‘the way’ for kids.

    But when I watched the programme and saw the kids appear to levitate the Waybuloo characters purely by ‘their power of meditation’ I was very concerned. The BBC is actively promoting religious practises to our children which I personally don’t want. This is not ok and this is not acceptable.

    I am a christian – either the BBC is neutral and unbiased to religious practises OR lets see kids TV on the BBC where they promote the power of prayer through Jesus!

    In my experience – when I once complained about a concern to the TV regulators when my eldest was young (which was Christina Agulera (sp?) taliking about her use of her sexuality (on a kids TV programme!!!!!!???)) I was condesendantly told that this was ok and accpetable and basically my complaint was ignored – I am going to try to get these concerns highlighted by other means if necessary and may come back here to let you know how I get on!

    I’m sure other people of other faiths will have strong feelings about this too!

  5. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    I’m just about to complain but I’ve done a Youtube vid too – see what that does – by all means ‘spread the word’ via Facebook and similar if you can.

    Sorry for some of my spellings by the way – being quick.

    See my featured webpage on Youtube.

  6. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

  7. Leigh Porter Says:

    The BBC’s motives for these things as a group are usually quite tame, but there are individuals within the BBC who do have an agenda to push.

    There are also powers and principalities at work who certainly have an agenda.

    What I think this raises though is that it is not the BBCs responsibility to bring up our children in the way of the Lord, it is ours as Christian parents. We will be held accountable and not the BBC. I’m happy to let my kids watch Waybuloo and anything else on CBeebies but I will explain that it is through Jesus Christ and a relationship with Him that we find contentment and life.

    Rather than shield my children from the world, I’d rather they be exposed to it and be able to give an answer for the hope they have within themselves amidst an unbelieving world.

    Praise be to God for His truth.

  8. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    Re: Webmater’s and Leigh’s replys.

    I’ve had a reply from the BBC too. And it is what I would expect too. They haven’t really listened I feel.

    Do you know that when I first watched the show that if the kids were ‘just’ meditating in the yoga position I probably would have ‘let it go’ (like we often do with a lot of things in life). But when the programme indicates to kids (who have little perception betwen reality and fiction) that there is ‘a power’ when we sit down and do this then I have concerns ( that they can levitate characters). For me the whole programme reads as if it is telling kids that when you have a problem, meditate – it really works. Now, for me, I dissagree with that. This IS a recognised belief being pushed here on kids TV – and contrary to a lot of others beliefs (Christian or not). Don’t get me wrong – there IS christian meditation too – this is communing with the person of God.

    I have already had one email from a christian friend who was surprised to find her child in the yoga position ‘meditating’ and couldn’t work out where this had come from until she saw the vid.

    I am aware that there are sadly a lot of neglected kids in our country (and beyond) whose only comfort may be CBeebies and it is important that the programming can at times offer hope and ‘an escape’ – its my perception that perhaps this is why we’ve ended up with this ‘model’ of a TV show.

    However I choose not to let my kids watch it as it is promoting something I don’t thing is ‘the’ solution.

    I just think that either the BBC has a level playing field and does not promote one ethos over another OR equally promotes other faith ‘models’ just as equally. That is the point I personally am trying to make.

    The BBC MAY listen to numbers – so if like me you found this blog after being concerned then register your complaint as above IF you feel strongly about it. My guess that that is what they will listen to eventually.

    For God SO loved THE WORLD that He gave His ONLY son. So that whoever believes in HIM will not perish but have eternal life.

  9. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    By the by – just followed up the links from the BBC on the programme descriptions/blurb.

    They don’t really hide the fact that the programme is very allegorical – I hadn’t realised that the name of the magical land in Waybuloo – Nara – means ‘happiness’ too.

    An aside – the facts and figures at the end are quite mind boggling when you consider the VERY popular kids TV shows of the 70′s were probably done on a shoestring in comparison.

  10. Andrew Says:

    My wife and myself watched Waybuloo with disbelief – could the BBC really be promoting yoga / eastern mysticsim on a programme aimed at under 5′s? Sadly, the answer is yes. It’s deeply disappointing and in my opinion a totally inappropriate for a number of reasons – not least, the spending of taxpayers’ money. The comments I’ve read from those involved in the show and from the BBC seem to reinforce that fact that they just don’t seem to get it. Christians in the UK seem to be treated with almost contempt by certain “cultural elites”.

  11. Lasha Says:

    This BBC programme is just wrong. Not because it doesn’t promote Christ, but because it promotes religion.

    We should allow our children to watch completely secular tv which I thought CBeebees would do. But no, it brings on yoga and levitation! Not good. At all.

  12. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    Just to answer Jack above – and some general comments: -

    I think the comment about ‘Antichrist’ can read strongly to a non-christian as I once was but the word ‘antichrist’ simply means someone who is not following christ (if you are not FOR Him you are against him). There is no ‘sitting on the fence’. That’s what the bible teaches. Not to be confused with ‘the antichrist’.

    I think that the ‘experts’ who comissioned this programme are very naive and have absolutely no understanding of why such a programme can be offensive to christians (and likely people of other faiths).

    Jesus said ‘I am the way. No one comes to the Father (God) except through me’. This is very significant to christians.

    So when a childrens(!) TV programme very clearly advocates Yoga (a religious practise/belief) as ‘the way’ (‘Way’buloo’s) contrary to christian teaching it can be offensive. Why??

    1. Because it is against christian teaching.
    2. Because at times it is nice to be able to let my 3 year old watch some CBeebies without having to think about censoring things I may not agree with. This has not been a problem for me until now.
    3. Because it is appears to be another example where christian belief in this country appears to be ignored (especially compared to other beliefs).
    4. Because surely CBeebies should be neutral??! (I have never had a problem with other CBeebies programmes showing other faiths in an educational way).
    5. The promo material bangs on so much about ‘experts’ designing the programme – who have likely been highly paid – (read 1 Corinthians 1 v 18-21).
    6. To a lot of people Yogic practises are not big deal (and I accept it has been ‘westernised’ often) – but it is still a religious/spiritual practise – no two ways about it. It is NOT simply a relaxation technique.
    7. If the BBC made a kids TV programme pushing the positivity of praying when problems occurred to kids I bet there would be a lot more strong opinions about that. Somehow I feel that won’t happen for a while at least. I can’t remember the last time I saw anything even remotely like that on kids TV.

    Quite a lot of people simply think we are being intolerant or narrow minded. From my point of view it does not feel like a level playing field. Surely the buzz-words in the last 10-15 years have been words like ‘equality’ and ‘tolerance’ – well this programme is NOT equal in its bias or tolerant of christian beliefs (or others).

    Please let me be clear – there are millions of more important issues in the world – but some ‘smaller’ issues do motivate people sometimes into action (e.g. fox-hunting).

    If this programme is going to go world-wide then I think at the minute you have likely only touched the tip of the iceberg in terms of people who are aware of what Waybuloos is promoting. It is not Teletubbies, ITNG, Fimbles – this is a new departure.

  13. Rachey Says:

    BBC say this Yoga Happiness State of Mind is perfectly innocent maybe so in their minds but as with anything its good to investigate yourself and to delve a little deeper into the actual origins of yoga is really quite shocking what you find
    yes waybuloo is sugar coated & the deeper meaning of yoga is in a brief description below: (PS I dont mean to suggest the bbc are aware of this they are merely using elements of a religion; the nice bits!)

    How far back in history can yoga be traced? Figures of people seated in various yoga positions appear on seals found in the Indus Valley, in present-day Pakistan. The Indus Valley civilization is dated by archaeologists to between the third and the second millenniums B.C.E., very close in time to the Mesopotamian culture. Artifacts from both areas portray a man, representing a deity, crowned with animal horns and surrounded by animals, reminiscent of Nimrod, the “mighty hunter.” (Genesis 10:8, 9) The Hindus claim that the figures sitting in yoga positions are images of the god Siva, lord of the animals and lord of yoga, who is often worshiped through the lingam, a phallic symbol. Thus, the book Hindu World calls yoga “a code of ascetic practices, mainly pre-Aryan in origin, containing relics of many primitive conceptions and observances

  14. Sam Says:

    Dear Mrs Strydom

    Thanks for your e-mail about CBeebies.

    Whilst I was pleased to read that your children have enjoyed watching CBeebies, I understand that you feel you can no longer allow your children to watch the channel and I note your specific reference to meditation and Eastern faith. I also understand you would prefer if programmes focused on the Christian faith.

    It’s not the intention of programme makers to promote any one religion. However, we do wish to reflect the experiences of children living throughout Britain in our storylines.

    We make programmes within a multi-faith, multi-cultural society and we also have to bear this in mind when making children’s series. We want our programmes to be relevant and engaging for all children and feel it’s important to inform and educate them about culture and the world; with the learning of different activities and experiences all being a part of this.

    Ultimately, we set out to provide children with a wide variety of programmes in order to cater for their different ages, tastes and needs. We believe we’re constantly in the forefront of children’s programming, and offer the widest range of imaginative and informative programmes but we do appreciate that not every programme will appeal to every child, or their parents.

    I can assure you that we do appreciate your feedback and as such your comments have been fully registered on our audience log. This log is made available to all members of the BBC, including the Cbeebies teams and senior BBC management.

    Feedback of this nature helps us when making decisions about future BBC programmes and your comment will play a part in this process.

    Thanks again for taking the time to contact us.

    Regards

    Nicola Maguire
    BBC Information
    ________________

  15. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    I had pretty much the same email reply from the BBC as above.

    They don’t seem to get the point that promoting one religious belief over others is not multifaith but are still plugging that line.

  16. Julia Says:

    I am not alone!! Got the promo DVD and alarm bells rang for me. Wasn’t sure what to make of it. Have had it on the TV a couple of times. Tried to convince myself that it’s harmless but have felt very uncomfortable on the handful of occasions that we have stumbled upon it. My one year old is mesmerised. Having read this blog I’ll be turning it off next time. Many thanks for raising awareness.

    I’ll be making a complaint… BBC Complaints: https://www.bbc.co.uk/complaints/forms/

  17. Paula Says:

    Was watching Waybuloo with my 4 year old daughter and was so shocked! I have just complained to the BBC too but I’m sure I will get the same response as others. It is so normal no for Christians to be ridiculed. They talk about tolerance on one hand and on the other give Christians a hard time esp if we speak out. But we must!!!

  18. Laura Says:

    i am a mother of 6 and 5 year old boys and they’ve been watching this programme for a while now, and i dont like it one bit, they’re teaching yoga to children not old enough to understand the meanings of the moves and of meditation.

    I’m not the go to church type christan, i worship in my own way and even i find this terrible, if the bbc were to do a childrens show based on Christan beliefs and practices there would be a complete uproar from parents….we are officially living in a society of people that are far more interested in the religions of other ‘gods’ who are false idols…im disgusted…sorry if im ranting lol x

  19. Paula Roberts Says:

    “Dear Mrs Roberts

    Thanks for your e-mail regarding ‘Waybuloo’.

    I understand you feel this programme’s use of yoga and Eastern exercises could
    indoctrinate younger viewers and may contravene our principles of impartiality.

    I assure you that it’s not the intention of programme makers to promote any one
    religion or religious practices. However we do wish to reflect the experiences
    of children living throughout Britain in our storylines. I’m sure you’d also
    agree that encouraging and helping children to be active and healthy can only be
    a good thing.

    We make programmes within a multi-faith, multi-cultural society and we also have
    to bear this in mind when making children’s series. We want our programmes to be
    relevant and engaging for all children and feel it’s important to inform and
    educate them about culture and the world; with the learning of different
    activities and experiences all being a part of this.

    Ultimately, we set out to provide children with a wide variety of programmes in
    order to cater for their different ages, tastes and needs. We believe we are
    constantly in the forefront of children’s programming, and offer the widest
    range of imaginative and informative programmes but we do appreciate that not
    every programme will appeal to every child, or their parents.

    Each new generation wants something different. Judging by the letters of
    appreciation we receive and the obvious popularity of our children’s television
    characters and personalities, it is precisely the elements that some grown-ups
    object to in today’s children’s programmes that can make them so popular with
    their intended audience.

    I’ve included a couple of links detailing the show’s concept and aims, which I
    hope you find useful.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/proginfo/tv/2009/wk20/feature_waybuloo.shtml

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/grownups/about/programmes/waybuloo.shtml

    I’d like to take this opportunity to assure you that I’ve recorded your comments
    onto our audience log. This is an internal daily report of audience feedback
    which is circulated to many BBC staff including senior management, producers and
    channel controllers.

    The audience logs are seen as important documents that can help shape decisions
    about future programming and content.

    Thanks once again for contacting us with your concerns.

    Regards

    Gerald McCusker
    BBC Complaints

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/complaints

    Typical!!! It really does make you wonder!!!

  20. Maxine Says:

    Funny! I really thought I was alone in my thoughts when I saw the first showing. My alarm bells went off big time! The music, the crystals, the poses they perform and encourage the children to do and, the floating all disturbing. Let us continue to stand against such things and teach our children Godly values.

  21. David Says:

    Hi everyone. I have got a 3yo whom I have left unattended watching CBeebies because i believed CBeebies would not hurt a fly. With the emergence of Waybuloo, i now know better. I think we have a huge responsibility than ever before as Christian parents to teach our Children, in the way of the Lord and also to recognise the appearances of wolves. These little children, how can they know the difference except we invest a huge amount of our time and energy into showing them the WAY. We cannot afford to fail in this responsibility as God would make us answer for what happens to them. We must do everything with all the strength and power God has given us to protect our children as a Shepherd would do to his flock even if it means going to the highest seat of power in this Land to wage Spiritual warfare and to turn the minds of our leaders PM, MPs. On a bigger picture of things, I think it is time for us as Christians to be more and more vocal about the Good News, and allow God to move in our Nation with signs and wonders, believe me the god of budha and his fellows would come crashing down just like the god of the philistines, Dagon.

  22. Heather Swanson Says:

    Hi there, I am very pleased to have been told about this site. First time I heard the music of Waybuloo in the backgroud I had alarm bells ringing, I have just written a complaint to the BBC and will have also forwarded my complaint to the Times Newspaper in case they are interested in a story – If the BBC do not remove this programme then I will continue to complain and call round other newspapers. What’s next? Balamory characters sitting round a ouija board? We are still a christian country are we not? when they tried to take out bibles from hospital chapels etc christians made a stand and the bibles were “allowed” to stay. May I encourage you all to persevere and take a stand as far as you can such as other newspapers – etc etc. perhaps we should get an online petition going. does anyone know how to start it?

  23. Jolonui Says:

    Hi everyone.

    I’m glad to see this subject covered here. The Waybuloos is not about Yoga or Buddhism but part of something far more serious. There is a big promotion of the coming New Age and this program was designed to condition the minds of adults and children into New Age practices.

    The sun dial is the focal point of the program and the sun is also prominent in the Tellytubbies because New Agers worship the sun. The clues to this in Waybuloos are the dial itself, crystals and astrological symbols present on the dial. Evidence that this program sways more towards the New Age movement.

    Tellytubbies, Waybuloos and in the night garden all have a common theme and feature outdoors (worship of nature by New Agers), underground bunkers (protection of nature and landscapes vital to New Agers), sun worship (Tellytubbies and Waybuloos), and Astrology (Gazeebo with a orb/star on top transforms into the Cosmos – In the night garden).

    To see who is responisble for this wave of New Age promotion check out the United Nations, Lucis Trust who provide literature for the UN (previously known as Lucifer publications) and Helena Blavatski.

  24. Christian mother Says:

    Is the UK mainly an eastern country? I thought western, should there not be more western beliefs than eastern beliefs in the UK?

  25. Becky Says:

    Hi,
    I have to admit it did alarm my slightly when I saw it. My little one likes doing all of the shapes and she thinks the crystals are ice creams so half of me thinks she doesn’t understand. Then the last time she watched it she sat down and copied the meditating bit where they levitate the piplings and that really gave me the creeps! I totally agree with the remarks that if there were a programme where the children pray it then people would be in uproar. To say that they make programmes for a multi faith viewing audience is completely ridiculous. This programme definitely pushes one philosophy and the major religions in this country all have prayer as part of the their belief system. So I for one will be registering my complaint. She is far too young to understand what it all means but in a way that makes it even worse. If they want to encourage children to move then they should do more stretching and exercise in Boogie Beebies and Show Me Show Me!

  26. Jo Hewlett Says:

    I agree with so many of you here, I too have filed a complain. In addition, bedtime routine is wrecked now that this programme is on at 6pm! I am so cross about the Waybaloo programme and the dodgy stuff they are getting children to do or think about. I think this requires serious prayer!

  27. Sharon Pomeroy Says:

    Hi I also wanted to echo the same concerns as many of you have raised. I have a 5 year old with moderate-severe learning difficulties who adores Cbeebies and due to his mental age, is likely to watch it for some years!

    I had always thought it a safe channel to watch as the programmes are largely educational or entertaining.

    He has been watching it for some weeks whilst I was making tea in the kitchen and I had thought it a strange programme from the music and occasional glimpses, but it was only when I saw the yoga and levitation that I was shocked at the promotion of religion.

    I have sent a link to your site round a few facebook friends!

  28. James Middleton Says:

    It’s the usual double standards. I would rather my two sons watch secular – non-religous programmes. Away from the TV, my children and gently introduced to Christian themes and are encouraged to pray. This is mine and my wife’s choice. I’m not altogether happy that the BBC are now peddling alternative religion.

    I have respect for other religions and always try to find the truth and common ground in each (as Jesus did), although I do believe in (what I personally believe to be) the absolute truth of Jesus Christ. BBC, leave religious education to us parents.

    I’m not offended by this programme, but I am insensed that the BBC would demostrate such double standards – it’s typical of our times I’m afraid. It’s okay to talk Hinduism, Islam, Pagamism, etc, but Christianity is strictly off the menu. Debating belief between consenting adults is a very good thing…just hands off the children!

    My son Sam is now greiving the loss of ‘In the night garden’ which has now been shuffled to beyond his bedtime to make way for this empty effort. ‘In the night garden’ is a lovely programme with no hidden agender. Reminds me very much of Trumpton, the Klangers and many other excellent childrens TV from my childhood.

    BRING BACK IGGLE-PIGGLE!

  29. kathryn Says:

    It is wonderful to read all your comments, i knew i couldnt alone in my suprise at the obvious expression of alternative spiritualities in waybuloo. It is true that chilldren of the cbeebies demographic are too young to truely understand the undercurrant of the programme however they are so easily influenced and will happily copy whatever is made to look fun, it is terrible that children are being coersed into imitating worship positions unknowingly!! As a christian I have decided NOT to let my two children watch it!!

  30. Dan Thurgood Says:

    We too have decided to ‘ban’ our children from watching Waybuloo for all the reasons above. I was well excited when I was first able to sit down and watch it with my four years old and horrified by the crystals, chanting, meditation and yes, levitation! And then they’ve got kids doing it live too! (admittedly, not levitating)

    Let us not forget that thousands of Christians complained to the Beeb about their showing of the Jerry Springer last Christmas. Did they back down and remove it from the schedule? No, of course not. They are not a Christian organisation, and therefore we can’t expect them to behave like one. As someone has already said, it’s our job to be the gatekeepers for our children until they are old enough to make their own decisions. There’s always the off button folks! ;-)

  31. Rob Pomeroy Says:

    I have added my voice to the complaints raised with the BBC, as follows:

    /—-

    Sirs,

    My wife and I have this week by chance watched an episode of Waybuloo with growing alarm. We have been in the habit of allowing our children to watch CBeebies unattended over recent years, but unfortunately it has been necessary for this to cease immediately given this programme’s content.

    CBeebies is produced with impressionable children in mind and the broadcaster therefore must accept it has an onerous duty of care in selecting and vetting material for broadcast. It is the opinion of my wife and me that you have on this occasion utterly failed in that duty.

    While the content of material on CBeebies is generally excellent (for which we are very grateful) Waybuloo represents an unacceptable deviation from this norm. If CBeebies were held out as a channel dealing with religious matters, we would be forewarned, but that is not the case. Waybuloo undeniably promotes identifiable lifestyles and practices that have their roots in Eastern religion and mysticism. This includes yoga and meditation and cumlimates in leviation.

    If CBeebies is to redefine itself as a channel promoting particular religions and lifestyles then it must do so in a transparent, unbiased way. Taking the programming as a whole, the inclusion of Waybuloo is neither transparent nor unbiased. (Are there other programmes on CBeebies promoting partiular religious practices? We are not aware of any.) Notwithstanding the above, we would prefer CBeebies to remain religiously neutral. At the age of CBeebies’ target audience, we would maintain that parents have the exclusive right to make decisions concerning the presenting of spiritual material to their children. Please note we do not object to the presentation of religion in an educational, unbiased, factual manner. Waybuloo simply does not fit these criteria.

    Our feelings on this matter are of such magnitude that we are obliged to explore alternative entertainment options for our children. We are also considering entirely withdrawing our support for the BBC represented by our licence fee and purchase of BBC merchandise.

    I cannot emphasise strongly enough how very disappointed we are to discover that we can no longer trust CBeebies. Your decision to broadcast Waybuloo is in our view grossly inappropriate and has completely undermined our faith in the CBeebies programming schedule.

    On a more positive note, may I say as a father of two disabled children, how delighted we have been to see an expanding policy of inclusion at CBeebies. While this is no way offsets our dismay expressed above, we do trust that this acceptance and promotion of the needs of disabled people will continue and increase.

    Rob & Sharon Pomeroy

    —-/

    I received a predictable, largely “boilerplate” response from the BBC:

    /—-

    Dear Mr Pomeroy

    Thanks for your e-mail regarding ‘Waybuloo’.

    I understand that you object to the content of this programme and you feel that it promotes identifiable lifestyles and practices that have their roots in Eastern religion and mysticism.

    Please let me assure you that this isn’t the case. Although some ideas may have been used from different cultures, we wouldn’t promote any particular religion in any of our children’s programming.

    We do appreciate your concerns however and I’d like to take a moment to assure you that your comments have been registered on our audience log. This is a daily report of audience feedback that’s circulated to many BBC staff, including members of the BBC Executive Board, channel controllers and other senior managers. It’s also published on our intranet site, so it’s available for all staff to view.

    In addition to this, we regularly compile tailored audience feedback reports for specific programmes so they can have an overview of all contacts received about their series. If a report’s compiled relating to this issue, then your comments will also appear here.

    Thanks for taking the time to contact us with your concerns.

    Regards

    Rick Miles
    BBC Complaints

    —-/

    To this, I have replied:

    Dear Sirs,

    Thank you for your reply. You say, “Please let me assure you that this isn’t the case.” Of course it IS the case that Waybuloo “promotes identifiable lifestyles and practices that have their roots in Eastern religion and mysticism”; this was the whole purpose of my complaint. You may as well say, “Thank you for contacting us. You’re wrong.”

    While I am pleased to note that this complaint is logged for further reference, I’m afraid I feel obliged to take this further, through Ofcom.

    Regards,

    Rob Pomeroy

    —-/

    …and that is exactly what I’m doing. Ofcom have asked me for specific details (time, dates, programme contents), which I will supply shortly.

    The more complaints the BBC recevies, the more likely they are to take them seriously, EVEN IF YOU FEEL THEIR RESPONSE IS FOBBING YOU OFF. So don’t be disheartenend.

  32. Alison Says:

    I want Waybuloo removed from the airwaves now!! I’ve just made a comment on the CBeebies website FAQ saying that I find it creepy and its too new age in its influences. What really bugs me is that the presenters who my 15 month old daughter really likes are all doing the yoga type actions as well. She looks at me not understanding why the TV goes off and bath time starts half-an-hour earlier and then resumes with In the Night Garden which I feel much more comfortable with.

    From the opening of the programme I just feel uneasy about the whole thing and its not an influence that I want my daughter to be exposed to at such a young age.

    I even had a chat with a non-Christian friend about the programme and she said that she found it creepy as well.

    The more of us who let the BBC know this the better and then lets hope they can change the viewing schedule at least.

  33. Rob Pomeroy Says:

    Update: I have sent details to Ofcom as they requested. You can follow progress here: http://pomeroy.dyndns.info/content/waybuloo-complaint

  34. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    I sent a second complaint to the BBC who have basically ignored this (after pursuing it). Christians in this country are treated by the BBC as a minority group they ignore.

    I am now going to Ofcom too and would encourage anyone else reading this site to by all means complain to the BBC first (for numbers sake) but immediately go to Ofcom.

  35. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    Below is an excerpt from my complaint to Ofcom. What I realised doing it is that often the episodes spend most of the time conveying religious practise/symbolism (not ‘morals’ as has been argued on here). This effectively makes the programme a ‘religious programme’ according to the Ofcom code of practise on religious programmes. Waybuloo’s breaks codes 4.4 and 4.7 quite easily. If Ofcom ignore me I will look at the relevant european laws.

    Reading Mr Pomeroy’s blog above (comments by webmaster from here) regarding ‘vile comments’ – I am curious to know where previous complaints have gone from here. We have had previously had posts from people who have worked on the waybuloo’s programme. I’m sure there are a lot of people in the BBC don’t want to see us succeed. I think the people at fault are the people who commissioned this programme.

    Anyway (sorry) … here is most of my complaint to Ofcom…

    “I can refer to any Waybuloo’s programme but I will refer to the programme broadcast on 13th August (episode 14/50) “Catch”.

    My concern is that Waybuloo’s is proselytising religion to children. This is actually quite open through the use of Yoga (a religious practise) and various religious symbolism. Section 4 of your broadcasting code describes a religious programme as a programme as one whereby religion is a significant part of the programme as a central part. I believe most Waybuloo’s episodes convey this but the episode “Catch” cited above spends considerable time conveying religious imagery/practise. I would argue that it is the majority of the programme.

    The programme is very directive with the characters performing the yoga telling children to “Do this!”.

    What concerns me is that I thought CBeebies should be a neutral ground in terms of religion. I feel the BBC is promoting one religion very much over others.

    I have complained to the BBC twice. One line in their response stated they were catering to a multifaith audience. They are clearly NOT being multifaith by promoting one religious practise over others (which Yoga and all the other religious symbolism is).

    They have acknowledged reciept of my second complaint but (a month later) have not responded.

    CBeebies is aimed at very young children and I am concerned that this is effectively ‘religion by stealth’ as your broadcasting code 4.4 cites against.

    In a promotional DVD distributed by the BBC (which I first recieved at my childs nursery (paid for by public expense)) the episode featured showed a group of children levitating the characters using yogic powers. This is commonplace in Waybuloo’s episodes and contradicts code 4.7 directly that a programme should not “contain claims that a living person (or group) has special powers or abilities must treat such claims with due objectivity and must not broadcast such claims when significant numbers of children may be expected to be watching (in the case of television)”.

    If you search the internet regarding concerns over this programme you will find considerable concern expressed.

    This is a programme aimed at pre-schoolers. Some may say this programme is not doing any harm but I feel it is ‘indoctrinating’ children of this age.”

  36. Sam Says:

    I discovered this by accident and i agree with the comments made about the religious aspect of Waybuloo. I am a muslim and agree that religion should not be implemented on young children they do not understand such matters, my nephew who is 1 and a half years old is obsessed with the show, and he even copies some of the meditating i have have talked to his parents and they have decided to not let him watch this program. I believe this program encourages “idol” worship, from religions such as Hinduism and Buddahism, i think the BBC should just stick to producing non-religious, neutral programs such as Show me Show me.

  37. COMMON SENSE Says:

    We should not have any religion on T.V. It’s not right that T.V. or anyone else advise children on faith. Let them as adults make their own choices.

  38. Lil's mum Says:

    I have also complained to the bbc today, I have a 1 year old child and do not want her to be shown any other way other than ‘the way’ of Jesus Christ. we will be looking into alternative entertainment for our child.

    I work for a church as a children’s worker and I will be advising my parents and grandparents to complain aswell.

  39. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    Just to answer ‘Common sense’, if the BBC chose to start making ‘religious’ programmes for children that would be very ‘interesting’ (and something I would not necessarily be against) but I think the point is why havem the BBC chosen to all-of-a-sudden chosen to go (very deliberately) down this route!??
    I love what James says about religion “Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.”

  40. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    Oh yes – to be fair to the BBC – they have been in contact saying they are still dealing with my compliant. (interesting!)

  41. Lil's mum Says:

    My complaint Sent to the BBC Sat 26/09/2009

    I find this programme aimed at small children disturbing. I choose to bring up my child as a Christian and to find a programme promoting elements of worship from another faith, which when practised, promises to make my child ‘happy’, is discriminatory against religions such as Christianity, Judaism and Islam who teach about one god and the importance of worshipping only one god. I respect those who choose Buddhism as their faith and would not want small children to be influenced in any other way than their families when it comes to teaching about faith.

    The programme encourages children to participate in practising Yoga and is in essence indoctrinating them into that particular faith. As you do not represent the other faiths in this way on cbeebies, I do not see how the BBC can be respecting cultural and religious diversity and presenting a balanced view point.

    I believe this indoctrination is made more serious as it is the only programme on cbeebies broadcast three times a day.

    It would be confusing to small children to present all major religions in the way this programme has been for Buddhism, and it would be better to focus on common values and morals.

    I feel that it is better to leave parents in control of developing their children’s faith. There are tools for encouraging children available for all world religions and parents.

    I expect secularism from the BBC not religious bias, and I’m looking to find alternative channels for my child to watch to avoid this programme.

    Their response! 30/09/09

    Thanks for your e-mail regarding ‘Waybuloo’.

    I understand you feel this programme’s use of yoga and Eastern exercises could indoctrinate younger viewers and may contravene our principles of impartiality.

    I assure you that it’s not the intention of programme makers to promote any one religion or religious practices. However we do wish to reflect the experiences of children living throughout Britain in our storylines. I’m sure you’d also agree that encouraging and helping children to be active and healthy can only be a good thing.

    We make programmes within a multi-faith, multi-cultural society and we also have to bear this in mind when making children’s series. We want our programmes to be relevant and engaging for all children and feel it’s important to inform and educate them about culture and the world; with the learning of different activities and experiences all being a part of this.

    Ultimately, we set out to provide children with a wide variety of programmes in order to cater for their different ages, tastes and needs. We believe we are constantly in the forefront of children’s programming, and offer the widest range of imaginative and informative programmes but we do appreciate that not every programme will appeal to every child, or their parents.

    Each new generation wants something different. Judging by the letters of appreciation we receive and the obvious popularity of our children’s television characters and personalities, it is precisely the elements that some grown-ups object to in today’s children’s programmes that can make them so popular with their intended audience.

    I’ve included a couple of links detailing the show’s concept and aims, which I hope you find useful.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/proginfo/tv/2009/wk20/feature_waybuloo.shtml

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/grownups/about/programmes/waybuloo.shtml

    I’d like to take this opportunity to assure you that I’ve recorded your comments onto our audience log. This is an internal daily report of audience feedback which is circulated to many BBC staff including senior management, producers and channel controllers.

    The audience logs are seen as important documents that can help shape decisions about future programming and content.

    Thanks once again for contacting us with your concerns.

    Regards

    BBC Complaints

    the links take you to their page that talks about this programme as a ‘philosophy for a happy life’, you could describe any religion in these terms, it is so frustrating the way they can justify themselves and change the rules as they see fit. this is not a level playing field. am going to look at definitions of philosophy and religion,

    I’m thinking doing the ofcom it just finding the time!

  42. Sarah Pring Says:

    My email:

    The fact that the programme indicates to kids (who have little perception betwen reality and fiction) that there is ‘a power’ when we sit down and meditate causes concern, eg that they can levitate characters. For me the whole programme reads as if it is telling kids that when you have a problem, meditate – it really works. I disagree with that. This IS a recognised belief being pushed here on kids TV – and contrary to a lot of others beliefs. Surely the BBC should be completely neutral and not promoting any religions, or promoting them all equally. The backlash that would come as a result of showing a Christian based programme would be unbelievable, yet it is deemed acceptable to present Eastern religious ideas as the “way to happiness” according to the title. I refuse to allow my children to be indoctrinated like this and will be boycotting in future.

    And what appears to be a standard response:

    Dear Mrs Pring

    Thank you for your e-mail regarding ‘Waybuloo’.

    I understand you feel this programme’s use of yoga and Eastern exercises could indoctrinate younger viewers and may contravene our principles of impartiality. I assure you that it’s not the intention of programme makers to promote any one religion or religious practices. However we do wish to reflect the experiences of children living throughout Britain in our storylines. I’m sure you’d also agree that encouraging and helping children to be active and healthy can only be a good thing.

    We make programmes within a multi-faith, multi-cultural society and we also have to bear this in mind when making children’s series. We want our programmes to be relevant and engaging for all children and feel it’s important to inform and educate them about culture and the world; with the learning of different activities and experiences all being a part of this.

    Ultimately, we set out to provide children with a wide variety of programmes in order to cater for their different ages, tastes and needs. We believe we are constantly in the forefront of children’s programming, and offer the widest range of imaginative and informative programmes but we do appreciate that not every programme will appeal to every child, or their parents.

    Each new generation wants something different. Judging by the letters of appreciation we receive and the obvious popularity of our children’s television characters and personalities, it is precisely the elements that some grown-ups object to in today’s children’s programmes that can make them so popular with their intended audience.

    I’ve included a couple of links detailing the show’s concept and aims, which I hope you find useful.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/proginfo/tv/2009/wk20/feature_waybuloo.shtml

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/grownups/about/programmes/waybuloo.shtml

    I’d like to take this opportunity to assure you that I’ve recorded your comments onto our audience log. This is an internal daily report of audience feedback which is circulated to many BBC staff including senior management, producers and channel controllers.

    The audience logs are seen as important documents that can help shape decisions about future programming and content.

    Thank you again for taking the time to contact us.

    Regards

    Patrick ClydeBBC Complaints

    Having read the line about the elements which parents object to being that which most attracts the children, I am actually quite offended!! Last time I checked, my children (aged almost 4 and 2) were too young to be able to decide for themselves what is best for them. I was under the impression it was the parents’ responsibility to guide their children in what’s right, not the other way round. Obviously I was mistaken!

    I have replied to this email pointing out that if we are living in a multi-faith, multi-cultural society, surely there should be programming representing teachings from the Bible, Torah, Koran etc, yet this appears to have been overlooked. I have also pointed out that yoga is not exaclty encouraging children to be more active, but that I would welcome more along the lines of Boogie Beebies.

    I’m looking forward to what I would imagine will be another standardised reply!

  43. Lil's mum Says:

    just looked on the cbeebies chat board on their website, seems that people think its being pushed down their throats and it doesn’t seem to hold children’s attention.

    i agree with you sarah the comment about young children liking what their parent don’t very offensive, the whole condersending tone is offensive!

  44. TopBeat Says:

    Hi, I just wanna say that I have been on a forum called “break beat” and they are mocking these posts, but want to lend my support to you guys as I agree that this program is religious indoctrination (I have a 3yr old) and the BBC’s responses to your concerns are pathetic.

  45. Y Parch Says:

    I have been thoroughly disturbed with the BBC CBeebies programme, Waybuloo, since we started getting CBeebies on Freeview 3 weeks ago. It is clearly designed to indoctrinate pre-school children in the “way” of Buddhism/Eastern Mysticism. This contradicts the BBC’s Charter and is doubly odious as CBeebies makes no effort to present alternative religious worldviews, even Christianity. As the vast majority of British people claim that they are Christians and the majority of other adherents practise Islam and Judaism, it is highly surprising that the *only* religion portrayed and propagated by the BBC CBeebies channel is Buddhism.

    I encourage licence payers to write to the BBC’s governance arms to complain about this programme so that it may be discontinued.

  46. Wigglesworth Says:

    I don’t know about everyone else, but my God is greater than a kid’s TV show. Also, I tend to use the ‘off’ button when something comes on TV that I don’t like. Surely we have more important things to talk about/be getting on with?

  47. Kelly Says:

    I have read all the above posts and I see great contridictions. These being that Christian parents do not want their children infuleneced by a religion at such a young and impressionable age. Surely ‘raising’ your children to be ‘christians’ and followers of Jesus is exactly the same. Religion is a serious matter and can set out a path that your children may not want to follow. Religion should be taught to all children but in a constructive way, and children should not be ‘brainwashed’ in to thinking that a certain religion is the ‘right’ one. That should be a decision that they make when they are mature enough to understand the consequences. I am a mother and also was raised by christian parents. My mother taught me about HER religion and i also was taught about other religions, as will your children be taught at school.

    I feel really strongly about parents inflicting their beleifs on to their children, it can be so damaging and in later life and there could be resentment. I know from experience of friends. I think giving children a choice and tust empowers them, gives them self worth and confidence which are key values that can be used in adulthood.

    With regards to the BBC, if they are supposed to be imparial then yes they should axe the show.

  48. Rob Pomeroy Says:

    By way of update, Ofcom’s unsatisfactory response to my complaint can now be viewed on my website: http://pomeroy.dyndns.info/content/waybuloo-complaint

    In response to Kelly, above, it is entirely appropriate for parents to teach children TRUTH. It is fairly pointless being a Christian if you do not believe its claims to be true. Therefore it is aboslutely reasonable and indeed imperative that Christian parents teach Christianity to their children AS TRUTH. This of necessity implies that other religions contain false truth claims.

    Teaching truth is emphatically NOT the same as brainwashing, otherwise you may as well dub the teaching of science, mathematics, language, history, etc, “brainwashing”. Let’s not give in to the vacuous arguments of postmodernists who will ultimately assert that NOTHING is true. (In which case, what does that very assertion mean?!)

  49. No Way Waybuloo's Says:

    Back again – been offline for a while.

    I eventually had a reply from the controller of CBeebies (which was appreciated) – an excerpt of which is …

    “The primary emphasis of Waybuloo is a focus on social and emotionaldevelopment. The Piplings, through their play, exploration, friendships,adventures and interactions with CBeebies (real children on set) introduceand model emotions and positive behaviours to our young viewing audience. “The secondary focus of Waybuloo is on physical development with theinclusion of Yogo (simple exercises based on Yoga, Tai Chi and gentlestretching techniques). The yogo segments allow the child at homeopportunities to get up and move. It also models ways in which children canenjoy how it feels to move slowly and deliberately, as well as helping themimprove their motor-responses to stimuli. The introduction of yogo isdesigned to benefit children from the age of three by: · Encouraging body awareness and, through the physical activity, buildflexibility as well as grow in strength and develop their coordinationskills; · Encouraging co-operation and compassion as it is conducted in an enablingenvironment in which there is no competitive element; rather, co-operationand compassion are engendered between the children; · Help children to feel calm and relaxed. “Throughout the development and production of Waybuloo we have worked withleading experts within the field of children’s yoga who have consulted onthe poses shown within the programme to ensure that they are appropriatefor the target viewer.”

    I am seeking to reply but not had time. I then had a very poor, patronising reply from Ofcom who responded to things I hadn’t even complained about (Yogic flying!??). You just get the feeling that Ofcom is ‘in bed with’ the BBC as recent reports suggest.

    I have removed the video as the company behind Waybuloos appear to have taken some issue with the images.

    Some people just don’t seem to get the principle’s behind why minorities take issue with having other beliefs imposed on them (when the way Cbeebies did things were ok as they were). I’m sure lots of people said to the Jews in the 1930′s ‘what’s the problem? – it’s only a badge’. Again – I’m trying to highlight the principle here. This feels like it could be the thin end of the wedge.

    It was interesting on the video responses that a common theme was ” Yoga advocates peace” and then give me a load of abuse – nice.

  50. Max Says:

    In response to comments made by Rob Pomeroy:

    We should surely be teaching our children FACT and allow them to discover their own sense of TRUTH. Just because something is right for you, it does not give you or anyone else the right to remove that freedom of choice from their children. Christianity is a life choice and that choice should be made by adults who have been allowed the opportunity to consider which road they wish to take. The way you live your life should be example enough. As for Waybuloo, that again is a choice for parents. Because as you know, children can’t make that choice.

  51. Rob Pomeroy Says:

    Max your suggestion that there is a difference between fact and truth is a little difficult to understand. I would hazard a guess that you would take the view that the findings of science perhaps constitute fact? That being the case, I would be very interested to know if you could think of an example of a “fact” that does not rely upon an assumption – or to put it another way, “faith”. Science changes its mind with great regularly about what constitutes “fact”, in any event.

    Scientists like to use phrases such as “measurable” and “verifiable”, but any honest scientist, mathematician, whathever, will admit that these fundamental approaches rely upon an assumption that (for example) “natural laws” are immutable. Unless the observer is omniscient and eternal, it is logically impossible to prove this assumption; this is what makes it an assumption.

    Assumption, faith, call it what you will, underpins everything we “know” to be fact or truth. By all means rely on the “facts” that you believe in, but please don’t for one second believe that they have some greater claim to truth than those in which I trust.

  52. The rest of the world Says:

    “I have been thoroughly disturbed with the BBC CBeebies programme, Waybuloo, since we started getting CBeebies on Freeview 3 weeks ago. It is clearly designed to indoctrinate pre-school children in the “way” of Buddhism/Eastern Mysticism.”
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  53. webmaster Says:

    Well, much to my surprise as I was trawling through my news feeders, I came across a piece from Evangelicals Now, that features an article about Waybuloo and also mentions ‘No Way Waybuloo’ and this blog. Here is the article:

    Monthly arts and media column – Waybuloo: the path to happiness?

    The world of the Piplings is Nara, a wonderful, natural paradise where they explore the freedom of nature and help to preserve beauty and peace.

    In one episode of the programme Waybuloo, Yok Tok is concerned with keeping his ‘happy plant’ cheerful, another features the Piplings keeping a bubble up in the air to preserve its beauty and serenity. It is an unreservedly contented and carefree atmosphere.

    At frequent intervals, the crystals start chiming and it’s ‘Time for yogo!’. When the Piplings are enjoying themselves, they experience ‘buloo’, a state of happiness, which makes them float up into the air. They then perform a series of yoga moves, named after natural objects such as ‘tree’, ‘fish’, ‘wave’, ‘shell’. These are taken straight from yoga and can easily be identified as such. During these activities, the Pipkins talk to the viewer, urging: ‘You do it!’ After yogo, they float up into the air again.

    Christian concern

    Real children are featured in the programme too, and are known as Cheebies. They come into Nara to find the Piplings and invariably join in when it gets to ‘yogo time’. The yoga positions become much more recognisable when the Cheebies do them and include the initial lotus position with the fingertips of the thumb and first finger joined above the knees. As they perform this lotus position, the Cheebies hum a single note, while the crystals chime on the sundial record player contraption, causing the Pipkins to float into the air and attain ‘buloo’ once more, closing their eyes in ecstasy.

    Christians are concerned about this programme because it openly promotes the religious practice of yoga to children at several points in each episode. It presents happiness as something that can be gained through a series of yoga moves and chants and it shows children levitating the Piplings through their meditation.

    Christians have been very vocal in their criticism of the programme, partly because of the coercion of children, but also because of the lack of accurate representations of the Christian faith in BBC broadcasts. Imagine the scorn if Teletubbies featured children praying to Jesus about the situations they faced in life! Imagine the outrage if viewers were encouraged to pray along too! Yet this is the level of religious participation encouraged by Waybuloo.

    BBC replies

    The BBC has replied to many emails of complaint with the following statement: ‘We assure you that it’s not the intention of programme makers to promote any one religion or religious practices. However, we do wish to reflect the experiences of children living throughout Britain in our storylines. I’m sure you’d also agree that encouraging and helping children to be active and healthy can only be a good thing.

    ‘We make programmes within a multi-faith, multi-cultural society and we also have to bear this in mind when making children’s series.’

    The blogger ‘No Way Waybuloo’ on http://blog.echurchwebsites.org.uk has pointed BBC and Ofcom to Ofcom’s code of practice.

    She writes: ‘CBeebies is aimed at very young children and I am concerned that this is effectively “religion by stealth” which your broadcasting code 4.4 cites against. In a promotional DVD distributed by the BBC (paid for by public expense) the episode featured showed a group of children levitating the characters using yogic powers. This is commonplace in Waybuloo’s episodes and contradicts code 4.7 which states that a programme should not “Contain claims that a living person (or group) has special powers or abilities and must treat such claims with due objectivity and must not broadcast such claims when significant numbers of children may be expected to be watching (in the case of television)”.’

    Broadcasting law

    The laws of broadcasting broken by the BBC in this matter are such that Christians would be quite justified in getting really quite angry. However, it is probably more productive to avoid getting hysterical and to consider instead how discussions about the programme could open up conversations that point others to Christ as we give the reasons for the faith that we have.

    How about questioning what the path to happiness really is? Or why not try to open a discussion about the age at which we expect children to be aware of spiritual things?

    We could openly consider the best way to introduce children to our beliefs in a way that will encourage them to be independent thinkers. Within conversations like these we could talk about what matters to us and point out the reasons for which Christians are meant to be joyful in life!

    Most of the messages of Waybuloo will float high over the heads of most pre-schoolers, but the conversations that we have with our friends and colleagues about the programme may prompt us all to explore deeper truths for ourselves.

    Eleanor Margesson – Evangelicals Now

  54. Susan Says:

    Hi, I belong to two forums for mums – Greenparent and Pregnancy forum – and coincidently they are both ridiculing these comments about Waybuloo.

    However, I just want to say that I am so relieved to read this, as I am a born again Christian and a mummy and was really disturbed by this program on a spiritual level and am glad that I am not alone!

    Thank you!

  55. Concerned Mum Says:

    Lets keep sending the same complaint until they listen. We can’t allow choices to be made for Kids . If they are showing it on the adult channels , l don’t have a problem , but we have the responbility of teaching our kids the way they should go. Lets also pray that the Lord Intervenes on this Channel. Jesus says “Let the little ones come to me “.

  56. Tash Says:

    The very first day that waybuloo came on, alarm bells begin ringing. The levitation, yoga postures, and obvious eastern influences did not sit well with me. I was instantly not comfortable allowing my child to watch the program. I do not judge those who practice such things, being adults and able to make up their own mind. I am just not happy that a children’s program, designed for impressionable young minds, would be so blatant in it’s eastern spiritual philosophies. I do not wish for my child to be influenced in this way. I now do not let my child watch CBeebies on the scheduled Waybuloo times. I am glad that I am not the only parent who does not think this program is appropriate for young viewers.

  57. graeme campbell Says:

    surely we should be showing more science programmes as they are based on fact rather than word of mouth folk stories

    evolution not religion

  58. Jo Says:

    Hi all,

    Don’t get me wrong, I am a Christian and I’m raising my daughter in a Christian household – she is only little and doesn’t watch tv generally but I do watch Waybuloo with her at her bedtime – and until I came accross this discussion I had no idea that there was a debate about it!

    Personally I see it as harmless – after all it is only a tv programme – I doubt any children will see it as being anything other than that – entertainment. I don’t think there is anything wrong with children doing ‘yogo’, yoga, or any form of exercise/movement. I actually think it is quite a good thing for her to watch as it promotes good values such as kindness, helpfulness, generosity etc (which, as far as I believe, are also good Christian values).

    Lets put it this way – my daughter doesn’t see beyond the calming music, colourful characters etc etc, I doubt it’ll have any effect on her beliefs – after all it IS only a tv programme, I’d rather she watch that than some trashy cartoon which had fighting or violence or was just brain-rotting boring.

    People of course are entitled to their own opinions and I don’t dispute any of yours, I see where they are based.

    Best wishes to all!

    Jo

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